THOTB-5.0

After struggling with ideas for weeks (months!), season five of The History of Twin Bayous starts now (finally!)

The History of Twin Bayous – There’s a New Kid in Town

Meet David Dutranoy, an investigator with the United States Department of Justice who has been sent to Twin Bayous to look into charges of corruption and racketeering on the part of the Goombah crime family. Part of the investigation revolved around a mysterious event that occurred a couple of years earlier that wiped out whole neighborhoods in the town. The town’s mayor, Romero Goombah reported that a hurricane had struck the town. However, there was no evidence that such a thing had happened.

The investigation was expected to take a considerable amount of time, so Mr. Dutranoy was made to relocate with his family to the town. He, his wife Dotty and their four children moved into to the old Gentille house in the Eastdale subdivision. They rented the house from a woman named Donna Clemens.

The family relocated to Twin Bayous in the summer of 1955 just before the Leisure Day holiday.

On Leisure Day, David’s eldest son, Michael, was eager to meet people his own age, so he went to fairgrounds at the town square very early on the morning of the holiday. Michael’s traits were supernatural fan, neurotic, good sense of humor, & perceptive.

At that early hour, there were only two other people in the park – a young boy and woman on the skating rink.

Mike decided to join them and that was when he noticed the woman’s legs looked as if they were made of green leaves.

When they both finished skating, Mike greeted the woman and she introduced herself as Cortney Poindexter. Being a “supernatural fan”, Mike wanted very much to ask the woman about her legs, but thought it to be rude.

After the woman with the leafy-legs walk away, Mike turned and noticed there was an elderly woman looking at him.

The elderly woman called him over and introduced herself as Miss Janny Ringwald. (see Season Two / Episode V)

Miss Janny started off rambling about how she had lived in Twin Bayous all her life and that she had never seen Mike before, but then she let on that she knew exactly who Mike and his family were. At least, that is who she thought they were.Miss Janny explained to Mike that the woman he was talking to was her grandniece, the daughter of her niece Jaqueline. Then Miss Janny told Mike that the girl that he really wanted to meet was another grandniece: “I know! I’ll introduce you to my nephew’s daughter Carina!”, she told him enthusiastically.

Mike told Miss Janny that he was looking forward to meeting kids his own age and then managed to politely get away by telling the old woman that he need to rush off to sign-up for the soccer shoot-out about to start on the other side of the park.

After the match was over, sitting on the sidelines, Mike noticed a police officer looking around. He later learned the man was the Parish sheriff and Miss Janny’s nephew, Sawyer Clemens.

Moments later Mike heard someone calling his name and it was Miss Janny wanting him to come over and meet someone.

Miss Janny introduced Mike to her grandniece Carina Clemens. Mike was suddenly at a loss for words as Carina was a really cute girl and really cute girls made him forget what he wanted to say.

Miss Janny said that Carina had come too late to get anything to eat at the festival and she suggested that Mike and Carina go over to the sports bar and get a pizza that she would pay for. Taking advantage of Miss Janny’s generosity, the young folks went across the street.

When they walked in, Mike had to go to the restroom and when he came out, he was surprised to see Carina drinking a beer at the bar. He later learned that the Sheriff’s daughter could pretty much do whatever she wanted.

Mike got the pizza and then he followed Carina upstairs to another part of the bar.

After they ate, Carina said she was going have another drink. She offered to buy him a drink, but Mike declined and said he needed to go home and sleep.

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